The Benefits of Exercise During Pregnancy

|

Dangers of flying; the ultimate exercise – sex

Exercise While Traveling
Traveling naturally precludes exercising or moving around a whole lot, which can be dangerous for pregnant women. Make sure you get an aisle seat, so you can get up and move around easily. Women who are pregnant have a higher predisposition to forming blood clots in their legs, so movement of the legs is imperative. You should walk at least 10 minutes out of every hour on a flight.

It's wise to drink a liter of a sports drink before boarding the plane (in other words, tank up); then continue to drink water while flying because there is a tendency to get dehydrated while flying. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate (i.e., drink, drink, drink). Of course, that aisle seat will be a necessity if you do – and you'll get your exercise naturally by marching back and forth to the bathroom.

The Ultimate Exercise – Sex! (or Sex – It's Still a Three-Letter Word)
Depending on your feelings about the matter (and your partner's), sex can be a fun (three letters) and natural type of exercise, particularly if your partner is amenable. In most cases, your sex life should not be curtailed in any way, barring unforeseen circumstances like morning sickness interfering. (It's not particularly sexy or flattering to upchuck while your partner is being amorous.) Occasionally, a woman will feel less like having sex because she's tired or not feeling well; however, just as frequently, a woman may have an increased libido – always good for her mate.

When to Have Sex
It's important for your marriage/relationship that you still make time for sex, even though you're pregnant. Again, to quote Nike – just do it! Otherwise, there is the risk that your husband might get jealous of the baby before it's even born or feel as if he's coming second in your life. It sounds immature, but it happens. Although you may feel like hibernating for a few months, your husband is still very much alive and needs your attention. Schedule dates and time alone. It will pay off in good feelings all-round.

An FYI: The baby does not know you're having sex; nor does he/she care, so don't worry about a "third person" watching you.

From the Doctor's Perspective...
Some doctors suggest that a woman who is at full term and ready to deliver should use sex to stimulate labor. Marta insists that it's an ancient tribal custom, although I've never heard that theory.

From the Patient's Perspective...
Sorry, but when I was ready to deliver, sex was the last thing on my mind. Ancient tribal customs aside (and I have heard it somewhere, Dr. John!), anyone who tried to touch me that way might not have lived to tell about it. A woman near labor is not a pretty thing to behold or be around (at least not in my case).

When Not to Have Sex
Use common sense about not having sex. If intercourse causes you pain, stop it and consult with your doctor as soon as possible. If you have any unusual discharge before, during, or after sex; or if you have a leakage of fluid, these are conditions to report to your doctor. If you're bleeding, and it is undiagnosed bleeding, it needs to be checked out immediately. If you're having any kind of uterine contractions that you're unsure about, it's probably not a good time to have sex, and you should report your condition to your doctor.

Always be careful that your partner does not hurt you in any way, particularly your abdomen. Prolonged direct compression of a woman's abdomen during intercourse (the missionary position) could be harmful for obvious reasons (particularly in the later stages of pregnancy), but most other positions are OK. If your back hurts, you can always prop pillows under it or do whatever it takes to get comfortable.

In most cases, physicians will recommend that you should not have sex if you're in pre-term labor, for fear that you might stimulate the labor. Also, if you have placenta previa, it is generally advisable not to have intercourse or put anything in the vagina (you don't want anything to have contact with the cervix). Of course, if your water breaks, skip sex and go straight to the hospital (do not pass go; do not collect $200).

It's probably alright to have oral sex, but doctors don't know for sure. Orgasm in a woman can cause contractions of the uterus. It's unclear what component of sex may contribute to increased uterine contractions that could lead to pre-term labor. Doctors don't know if it's related to chemical reactions or a prostaglandin release. In other words, is it the physical act of intercourse that stimulates the contractions or is it caused by a woman's orgasm? These questions are difficult to answer, since the data is limited, but this is the reason that most physicians still suggest pelvic rest (or no sex) if a woman is in pre-term labor.

The Absolute Minimum
If you can exercise comfortably and without pain, then get out there and move. Exercising will keep you in shape during the pregnancy and probably make your labor and delivery easier and more efficient.

  • Exercise responsibly, meaning don't do anything that causes you pain at the time or later.
  • Walking is probably the best exercise during pregnancy. Buy a pedometer and track your progress.
  • Carry a water bottle with you at all times and use it. Getting dehydrated is one of the worst things you can do to your body. Staying hydrated is one of the best.
  • Feel good about yourself and enjoy sex. You're still a desirable woman, and your husband will appreciate the attention.
  • Having a baby does not mean limiting your life; it means expanding it, so keep doing the things you were doing before you were pregnant (within reason).


|

excerpted from:

Reproduced from Absolute Beginner's Guide to Pregnancy, by John Adams and Marta Justak, by permission of Pearson Education. Copyright © 2005 by Que Publishing. Please visit Amazon to order your own copy.


Pregnancy Day by Day

Tell us your due date to receive our daily newsletter and find out what is happening in this day of your pregnancy!

Already a member? Log-in here

August 31, 2014



Leftovers make deliciously healthy lunches, and save a lot of time. Use last night's dinner leftovers as the basis of your child's lunch — adding just one or two extra ingredients can make it seem like an entirely different meal.

Name of the Day

stay connected

highlights

Join BIC on our mission to save handwriting and Fight For Your Write! Writing helps kids become better readers, boosts their confidence and sparks their creativity. Visit BICFightForYourWrite.com to sign our petition to save handwriting!

11 Coolest Lunch Boxes for Kids
Send your child's lunch to school in style! Check out our picks for the 11 best lunch boxes with great features from BPA-free accessories to spill-resistant fabric.

7 Important Back-to-School Safety Tips
Follow these back-to-school safety tips to make sure your child stays safe on the way to school, in the classroom, and while on the playground.

Kindergarten Readiness App Wins Gold
Our Kindergarten Readiness app won the Gold Award of Excellence in the educational category at the 2014 Communicator Awards. This valuable checklist comes with games and activities to help your child practice the essential skills she needs for kindergarten. Download the Kindergarten Readiness app today!

© 2000-2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.